Updates from April, 2017 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • hardie karges 1:53 pm on April 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , night market, ,   

    Part 2, Street-Food Crisis in Bangkok: Panic, Hoarding and General Pandemonium :-) 

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    Let there be food on the street…

     

    Continued from previous…

    Solution: Ever heard of ‘night markets’? That’s what occurs when a few food vendors gather in the same area, after sundown, and it becomes a kind of makeshift food court, or much much more, and far preferable to sidewalk usurpers who become our—the pedestrian’s—mediator between life and death. Whenever these stalls are organized, everyone benefits, in hygiene, safety, diversity and organization. Apparently that’s what the Bangkok government wants to do…

    But the idea that street food is Bangkok’s best food is ludicrous. That’s like saying that America’s best food is KFC. Of course, part of the problem is definition. What passes for ‘street food’ in CNN’s next ’23 best’ are nothing like Bangkok, including New Orleans, which by Bangkok standards has NO street food, ditto Istanbul, or Paris, or Cairo, Marrakesh or Mexico City, all places that I know personally. Their sidewalks aren’t taken over by sidewalk seating and eating, just Bangkok, and much of Asia…

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    Morning market haul

     

    And the narrative that this is where poor people eat is absolute BS. This is where tourists eat, and tuk-tuk drivers, and working women, many occupying seats for hours at the time. People on a tight budget eat in the market, with much better food, cheaper prices and reasonable hours. According to a local hack:

    “It’s what’s for breakfast, lunch and supper: market food, not to be confused with ‘street food’, to which it is superior and more varied IMHO, including famous Thai curries, which are almost NEVER found on the street (read: sidewalk). Here is a typical morning market haul: spicy southern coconut-based curry (30B), northern tomato-based hot sauce ‘nam prik aung’ (20B), stir-fried chicken w/ ginger (20B), and sticky (glutinous) rice (20B). If I’d bought 25B worth of rice, instead of 20B, it would’ve lasted me all day, 95B = less than $3. Try that with ‘street food.’ เต็มอิ่มแซบ (More …)

     
  • hardie karges 1:41 pm on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Yaowarat   

    Part 1: Street Food Crisis in Bangkok, City of Angels, L-O-S… 

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    Best northern food in Chiang Mai, but not on the sidewalk…

    Land of Smiles, that is, until you f*ck with the food, just one spoonful short of the prized phrik (hot pepper) or sacred sugar, and you’re in real trouble, Thai food something of a gustatory dialectic wending its way between the extremes of spicy and jeut, sour and sweet, hot and cold flavors, filling or not. And now the military government wants to clean up the sidewalks of street vendors, including food vendors…

    Well, you’d think North Korea had begun launching missiles down south, the way the Twitter-verse and Facebookers are responding to Bangkok’s crackdown on ‘street food’ this week. Now everybody is Anthony Freaking Bourdain, with epicurean DNA, a favorite street chef in Bangkok, a culinary stiffie and a golden thumb for golden drum-sticks, browned and crisped to smoky perfection and ready for prime time… (More …)

     
    • davekingsbury 9:06 pm on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My son has just returned from Thailand and he and his family enjoyed the street food … will show him this when I see him next. Wonder if he had that som tam …

  • hardie karges 1:07 pm on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Manila, Philippines, ,   

    Looking for Buddha in Transit: Despite the Spite, There’s Danger in Anger… 

     

    IMG_2338A seven-hour layover is no fun anywhere any time and certainly not Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, where the idea of fun for an extended layover is to put you in a dark dank ‘transit lounge’ holding cell with fellow miscreants where at least the Internet is good, and they brought me some free food, better than I’ve ever gotten elsewhere, TBH, but still no fun…

    So when the flight is further delayed another hour, the news is even less welcome than usual, given the constraints on my time in destination Bangkok, where I already have only ten-and-a-half hours to pass through Immigration and Customs, sleep, cross town and check in at the other airport before my flight to southern Thailand departs, rush rush hurry hurry… (More …)

     
    • Esther Fabbricante 2:56 pm on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Your patience is astounding.

  • hardie karges 2:41 pm on April 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , International Buddhist College, Sadao, ,   

    Looking for Buddha in Southern Thailand… 

     

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    Intl. Buddhist College at Sadao

    Thailand may be famous for its Buddhism, but in southern Thailand Islam is king, in exact proportion to the percentage of persons of Malay ethnicity resident there, that being a crucial part of the definition of ‘Malay’, that and the language, usually referred to in Thai as ‘Melayu’ or ‘Yawi’, the latter better known as the name of the ancient Arabic script, but never as ‘Bahasa Malaysia’, the national language of Malaysia, and which, together with the dialects of Brunei and Indonesia, constitute a major international language…

    But such are the vaguenesses and vagaries of politics, and culture, especially in a region largely defined by outside influences, DNA betwixt and between them largely identical, I suspect, from the Philippines through, over and around China, to India, by land and thousands of islands no more than superficial dressing to their primordial differences, almost all of which came after, first from the Indians, then the Arabs, then Portuguese, Spaniards, Dutch, French English American, in no certain order of dishonor…
    (More …)

     
    • Esther Fabbricante 4:04 pm on April 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Wow! Sharing. What a writer!

    • Esther Fabbricante 4:10 pm on April 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Once a Baptist in Brandon. And what a writer!!

      Esther

  • hardie karges 12:29 pm on April 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Hualien, , Yilan   

    Taiwan: Looking for Buddha in Yilan and Hualien, and… 

    IMG_2290…nobody’s eyes, because you won’t find anything there, not somebody else’s, anyway, though maybe your own, if you’re capable of turning the mirror inward. But the outer world is always handy for a clue or two, a clean well-lighted place for books, or adoration, or something similar, like a good place to place a cushion in meditation, or a good place to witness in awe the indescribable majesty and magnitude of creation, the ineluctable modality of this slow cool world…

    Taiwan may have a population slightly larger than Sri Lanka’s twenty-plus million, but it’s only a little over half the size, and much more developed, including high-speed trains that California would drool over, so that means you can zip down the west side of the island in little more than a half-day—but not the east side, not quite, not yet, almost. That’s the more nature-laden indigenous-peopled sparser half of the island, with not too much in between, except along those same coasts… (More …)

     
    • Esther Fabbricante 12:46 pm on April 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      What can I say – except you are a hoot – taking it all in.

  • hardie karges 11:53 am on April 3, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Taipei,   

    Taipei 101, Introduction to Taiwan: Eat Drink Man Woman… 

    IMG_2219Taiwan has a bit of a strange reputation, something like a poor man’s Japan, or a renegade province of China, or an Asian wannabe-Amerika, or none of the above, or all of the above. And the reality itself is a little bit different. In fact it’s some of the above, neither all nor none, but parts of each in selected proportions, and parts entirely unique…

    In fact Taiwan is hardly known outside its own borders and somewhat patchy even there. Most famous as last refuge for Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang in 1948, after their defeat by the Communists of Mao Zedong, it was once almost as famous for the phrase ‘Made in Taiwan’ somewhere around the 1980’s, long after ‘Made in Japan’ was forgotten and shortly before ‘Made in China’ became the norm… (More …)

     
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