Tagged: hill-tribes Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • hardie karges 12:02 pm on October 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: akha, , hill-tribes, Huay Xai, , , , Mekong River, Muang Sing, Tai Dam, , Vang Vieng, ,   

    Time-Travel: A Tale of Two Towns in the Laotian Outback… 

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    At age 64, and after 155 countries and more than forty years of travel, it’s all time-travel now, going back to see something I once saw before, and seeing all the changes that time has wrought, rather than seeing it all virgin-like for the first time, a gap-year giggly-mouthed googly-eyed greenhorn, that prototypical wide-mouth chin-dropping awe that inspires sales of toothpaste and fashion, featuring credit cards and deodorant, dreams of midnights and long flights, and carrying prophylactics, just in case…

    But it’s all different now. What was once exotic is now just chaotic, and International Standard Pidgin English ensures that you’re not likely to miss a meal, unless you really want to. Hard-core travel cowboys consume geography like chocolate cake on Sunday, apps logging miles and journals logging impressions, with an index, a table of contents, and an itinerary to be followed, while professional travel bloggers merely follow the guidelines of their sponsors… (More …)

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  • hardie karges 12:25 am on December 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Chiang Dao, Chiang Mai, hill-tribes, Kwan Yin, Lahu,   

    Thai Holidays Outback Up North, part 3: Six Temples, Two Borders, a Maharishi and a Funeral… 

    Continued from previous…

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    Kwan Yin (Kuan Im) festival near Chiang Dao, with many hill-tribe participants…

    So after the funeral in Uttaradit Province, Thailand, I’d like to explore that new border crossing into Laos, but my priest has other ideas, and he’s the boss. I’m the driver. So that means another late night drive from near the Lao border all the way back to the small town of Sarapee near Chiang Mai, finally pulling in to the temple about ten p.m. dead tired and more than a little wired, from twisty windy back-country roads…

    This is all so that we can buy a new truck, to take to the Tai Yai ‘Shan’ people out on the Burmese border where we were last week. Seems they’ve graduated from blankets and dried noodles to new 4 x 4’s. Bizniz is good, I guess. So we do: drive, that is, out again past Pai, into the remote fastnesses of Mae Hong Son province, where foreigners are not usually even allowed to enter, much less drive, but membership has its privileges, I guess… (More …)

     
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