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  • hardie karges 11:51 pm on June 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , tuk-tuk,   

    Baby, you can drive my tuk-tuk… 

    Homemade tuk-tuk in Phichit, Thailand

    Homemade tuk-tuk in Phichit, Thailand

    Three-wheeled ‘tuk-tuks’ are more than a mode of transportation in SE Asia. They’re part of the culture. Most often found in Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia, not only do they provide cheap and reliable transportation–usually–but they also tend to liven up the urban landscape a bit. They are more flexible than auto taxis yet more stable than the motorcycle ones (NEVER!). More than that, sometimes they can even approach the level of an indigenous folk art, not unlike motorcycle choppers in the US and elsewhere. Now if only we could get them to charge uniformly reasonable fares. Maybe it’s time to install meters? They have them on tuk-tuks in India BTW… (Then there are tuk-tuks that are total pimp-mobiles, taking any and all ad money from the highest bidders, like those in Phitsanulok, Thailand)

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  • hardie karges 2:06 pm on June 16, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , taxi, , tuk-tuk,   

    Escape from #Laos, Stuck in #Thailand… 

    Travel by tuk-tuk in Asia

    Travel by tuk-tuk in Asia

    Our trip’s taken a bit of an ugly turn, what with increasing hassles with transport, taxis and tuk-tuks (see previous post). Call me a whiny backpacker if you want, but it’s bad enough that we’ve already dropped Savannakhet from the itinerary—just to mitigate those extra hassles—and I’m double-checking future hotel bookings to see if the locations are walkable from the bus stations. It’s more than can be explained away by the $5/gallon petrol cost, too, so taints the entire perception of the country.

    Let’s put it this way: taxis here like to charge by the passenger—even on a private run. That’s BS. That’s not communism (Laos is a Communist country); that’s retail, dahling. Being a backpacker (wearing a backpack, that is) was always as much about avoiding high-price city taxis as seeking countryside trails, after all. Just for the record, I do not wear my backpack fully square on both shoulders, but rather slung off one side with a flair for fashion.  But the current problems run deeper.

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    • Esther Fabbricante 3:01 pm on June 16, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, my – so exhausting to even read about the hassle of your trip.

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